Public Policy Forum Research

 

Sound economic development policy is critical to creating jobs, stabilizing local government budgets, and enhancing the region’s quality of life. The Public Policy Forum conducts a variety of research that is designed to inform government and community leaders about the impacts of local economic development policies and practices, as well as best practices nationally. We will continue our in-depth analysis of issues releated to workforce development, transportation, housing, land use, local government economic development policy, tax increment financing, income migration, and related issues.

Search Publications

Publications

Sep, 2008
On the reverse side of this report we present a resource map of Wisconsin's workforce development system that is intended to graphically bridge together state and federal funding specifically devoted to employment and training programs administered...
Aug, 2008
Worldwide there is increased attention to issues associated with climate change. While policy makers at various levels grapple with the broad policy issues associated with mitigating climate change, a portion of consumers and businesses are taking...
May, 2008
The recent history of transit in Milwaukee County is one marked by desperation and false hope. Simply put, public funding sources have not kept pace with growth in operating costs. While warning about the consequences, transit officials have averted...
Apr, 2008
A gap exists between the current status of child care in the U.S. and best quality child care. This gap is unfortunate, because high quality child care is associated with many short- and long-term economic benefits for both the children and society...
Feb, 2008
Tax Increment Financing (TIF) is southeastern Wisconsin’s largest economic development tool. With 176 TIF districts and $8.4 billion in property value, the collective tax base devoted to TIF districts in our region ranks behind only the city of...
Nov, 2007
From 2001 to 2006, households moving out of the seven-county southeastern Wisconsin region took with them $1.3 billion more in personal income than those moving into the region brought with them. This five-year loss represents a fraction (3%) of the...

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